Students from Watershed School who have been working on a greenouse gas inventory for Camden — left to right, Jack Morse, Christian Ray, Zeke Bryant, Beatrice Buckley, Lyra Kalajian, Mara Carpenter (not shown, but also working on the project, Alex Facq, Rachel Sizeler-Fletcher, Kalen Darney and Isabel Rodriguez)
Students from Watershed School who have been working on a greenouse gas inventory for Camden — left to right, Jack Morse, Christian Ray, Zeke Bryant, Beatrice Buckley, Lyra Kalajian, Mara Carpenter (not shown, but also working on the project, Alex Facq, Rachel Sizeler-Fletcher, Kalen Darney and Isabel Rodriguez)
Students from the Watershed School plan to present initial findings of a greenhouse gas inventory they have begun for the Town of Camden. In their illustrated presentation, “Getting Set to Draw Down Emissions,” to be held at the Camden Public Library from 4 to 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 6, students will share research detailing energy use by municipal, commercial and residential buildings as well as transportation. Interested members of the public are welcome to attend the students’ presentation.

Two months ago, Camden became the first Maine town to sign on to the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy. Joining more than 8,000 towns and cities around the world, Camden committed to assessing its current greenhouse gas emissions and developing a plan to reduce them.

Watershed School students began work in April on a greenhouse gas inventory, which tabulates total energy use from residences and commercial buildings, transportation, waste treatment and disposal, and production of drinking water. Software provided by the Global Covenant of Mayors will allow Camden to compare its energy use with that of other towns and cities. Its baseline levels will be used to set reduction goals and determine the best ways to draw down energy use.

Watershed students see this inventory as a critical step in the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. “They’re eager to assist the Town of Camden with this research,” says their instructor, Janet McMahon, “because they see the rapidly changing climate not only as a crisis, but as an opportunity to reimagine how we live our lives as individuals and as a community. The students realize that drawing down fossil fuel use will save Camden money over the long term because wind and solar energy are now less expensive than fossil fuels.”