Latest Rockland, Maine, weather
GO
search sponsored by
Thursday, September 20, 2018
  • In a few days it will officially be midsummer, but we hardly need a date on the calendar to tell us spring has, before our eyes, morphed into summer. The myriad shades of green that mark the leafing out of trees is darkening into a . . .
  • It’s frustrating, after we endure endless months of winter and mud season and are finally rewarded with perfect gardening days — warm sun and light zephyrs — to find we are expected to share them with blackflies, deerflies . . .
  • Sunflower seedlings pop up in our garden each spring, scattered by the goldfinches and chickadees who feed on the fat seed heads in the autumn. The seedlings are free for the taking; all we need to do is move them from the . . .
  • You’ve heard of weekend warriors, athletes who plunge into strenuous activities on Saturday and Sunday, then limp, aching and groaning, into work on Monday. Gardeners can easily fall prey to the same syndrome, even those . . .
  • I got an SOS call from my gardening partner in northern Vermont recently. The unpredictably cold spring had delivered a hard frost and the tips of his onion plants were all white. Would they survive? I reminded him of the old saying . . .
  • Gardeners from Maine to Masachusetts are complaining about the cold and rainy month of May thus far, or at least the ones I know are. As if damp and cloudy weren’t bad enough, time spent at a birthday party full of sniffling . . .
  • Mother’s Day should burst forth with puffy white clouds in a blue sky and 70-degree temperatures, but April showers seem to be late this year and rain is predicted. If the weather predictions are wrong, take Mom to the Coastal Maine . . .
  • Home & Garden: Think Small
    Fashion, food, cars and music ­ — all have trends, and gardening is no different. Recent trends in landscaping and horticulture include less lawn and more planted beds, with beds less formal, made up of naturalistic plantings . . .
  • At the end of this week we’ll begin our slow homeward trek north after spending the last 10 weeks in tropical Florida — a period of time that’s not quite long enough to garden, but why should that stop me from trying? This is the fourth . . .
  • Occasionally a reader of The Free Press asks my opinion on a gardening subject and I am happy to try and give a sound one. In this instance, a couple from Rockport who are serious gardeners who also like to plant . . .
  • Each morning before dawn I step out the door, leaving behind the inside air conditioning to sample the outside heat and humidity. Here in southwest Florida, where the temperature has been in the high 80s and humidity . . .
  • In early spring gardeners become preoccupied with seeds: buying them, starting them indoors, direct-seeding them into the garden. What better time to take a look at “Seeing Seeds: A Journey into the World of Seedheads, Pods, and Fruit” . . .
  • I’m still in southwest Florida, where it’s so hot and humid that snowbirds from Michigan, Wisconsin and as far north as Canada are packing up and returning home. Reasons for their flight include vague murmurings of . . .
  • While technically speaking it won’t be spring until March 20, the advent of Daylight Saving Time and the coming of St. Patrick’s Day and Easter all herald the end of winter. This is technically the earliest spring of our lives . . .
  • We’d all eat like kings if cabbage were on our preferred vegetable list more than the one day of the year it currently reigns supreme, with its boon companion corned beef. The traditional St. Patrick’s Day . . .
  • I saw my first mango and avocado orchards. Now I can die happy. There’s something about tropical fruits that fills a gardening gap in my life. While it’s true that I love northern orchards of apples and blueberries and strawberries, . . .
  • We headed south on a winter escape to Florida just ahead of the onset of subzero temperatures, outran a “wintry mix” turning roads to ice in North Carolina, and found clear sailing ahead until we ran smack into the Everglades Seafood Festival . . .
  • Gardeners who start onions, leeks and flowers like violas and snapdragons indoors have already ordered and received their seeds prior to planting them later this month. For the rest of us, there’s still time to sit by the fire and thumb . . .
  • When two e-mail correspondents mention microgreens just days apart, it inspires me to look into the subject, and also to wonder why I’m not growing them. Tiny in size — microgreens are often confused with sprouts — but big . . .
  • Super Bowl Sunday draws near, that holy day when most of the country gathers together to drink beer, eat lots, and cheer for their favorite team. If you live with a diehard fan of the sport, as I do, you’ve already had many months . . .
Looking for something older? Try our archive search