Latest Rockland, Maine, weather
GO
search sponsored by
Tuesday, February 20, 2018
  • The first of my purple asparagus began poking their dark noses through the soil last week. I've waited a long time to say hello to this first crop: one season to plant, then a second season when a few spindly spears emerged . . .
  • Full disclosure: any and all of the following gift suggestions would be welcome by this gardening mom; however, others would also enjoy them, so let's proceed. . . .
  • Home & Garden: "101 Things I Hate About Your House"
    Not me; I don't hate anything about your house. But Beverly Hills interior designer James Swan does, and in his book, 101 Things I Hate About Your House, he pulls no punches when he talks about grunge, grime, poor lighting . . .
  • On warmer nights I've left my bedroom window open so the spring peepers can sing me to sleep. Temperatures are rising, grass is greening, and soil is drying out. Could this be spring at last?
  • Crocus and lungwort are blooming and tulips and daffodils are up, but wait a bit before leaping into your newly revealed garden. Instead of leaping, take a stroll around and think about what worked for you last year and what did not. . . .
  • Each year the American Horticultural Society honors outstanding gardening books published in North America with its annual book awards. Books are judged on qualities such as writing style, authority, originality, accuracy and . . .
  • A note to my absent neighbors: I know that, if you were here, you would invite me to help myself to forsythia cuttings for forcing from the enormous thicket in your field. As you're never in residence until June, thus too late to . . .
  • Maine Maple Sunday is coming up on March 27, marking the sugaring season that is a multimillion-dollar industry for the state. Maple syrup, in addition to having a unique flavor, has the additional benefit of being an organic, local and sustainable product. . . .
  • Oh, look — snow/rain/sleet again, yawn. March sure can look a lot like February. And yet . . . the sun is stronger and around longer each day, snowbanks are receding, and indoor plants are blooming, while the spring glow of red-twigged . . .
  • Storey Publishing's spring list of new garden books includes one of interest to gardeners with all levels of experience. Homegrown Herbs: A Complete Guide to Growing, Using, and Enjoying More than 100 Herbs is a very humble title . . .
  • The prolonged cold of this seemingly endless winter has revealed the final course of wood at the back of the shed, finally forcing me to investigate an alternative heat source that I'd meant to try for years. . . .
  • Winter's a good time to read about what's happening in the world of agriculture. Not just new seeds and products, but how efforts to put a garden in every backyard and support Maine gardeners are faring.
  • The need for chocolate conveniently peaks just around Valentine's Day. Why not indulge with chocolate all day long - chocolate bread for breakfast, brownies for lunch, semifreddo for dinner. And don't forget that red satin heart full of chocolates . . .
  • Temperatures sink, while snow levels rise; but inside, the dreams inspired by seed and nursery catalogs remain steady. I've just come across a seed-related fund-raiser for schools and nonprofits that is offered by Renee's Garden Seeds. . . .
  • This is the quiet time for gardeners, browsing catalogs, making up seed orders and catching up on garden reading. Seed-starting can be put off for a couple weeks, but one thing that shouldn't be put off is paying some attention . . .
  • One of the first signs of spring arrives in the form of an e-mail telling me that the smelt camps on James Eddy are now taking reservations. While we land creatures struggle through icy blasts and blizzards, beneath the ice schools . . .
  • At the end of a long ride back to coastal Maine from the mountains of Vermont, we stopped off at a Vietnamese restaurant in Portland for a chill-chasing bowl of pho, which could be called the national dish of that country. . . .
  • The tree is down (unless you truly celebrate the full 12 days of Christmas and leave it up through Epiphany), the wrapping paper just so much fire starter, the New Year's resolutions firmly in place . . .
  • Gardening is as prone to fads as any other activity, and what may be new one year is very old hat the next: where are the upside-down tomatoes of yesteryear? Mostly gone, I believe, a victim of their own inherent flaws . . .
  • By the time this edition of The Free Press hits the streets last-minute shopping or baking will be winding down. Wrapping gifts, thinking about getting the house ready for guests and preparations for Christmas Eve or Christmas Day dinner . . .
Looking for something older? Try our archive search