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Thursday, February 21, 2019
  • Since my first gardening catalog arrived before Thanksgiving this year, I no longer feel it necessary to wait until January to talk about next year’s garden seeds, plants and trends. Not that you’d need a crystal ball to predict what’s . . .
  • Some call it poor man’s fertilizer. Skiers and other outdoor enthusiasts believe it makes winter in Maine worth living. But when I am finally put in charge of weather, I plan to be very judicious with snow allotment: a tasteful sprinkle will be . . .
  • Shopping for gifts for gardeners is always easy. Gardeners use many tools and wear them out on a regular basis, which means a new and improved version can be given. They read gardening books, and new ones come . . .
  • As I was tossing sauteed onions and celery into cornbread stuffing early Thanksgiving morning I thought of my grandmother, who would get out one of those old-fashioned meat grinders that clamped to the countertop as a prelude to . . .
  • For those who take consolation in knowing that in a few short weeks the solstice marks the return of the sun, here is a heartening statistic: On December 1 we have only 9 hours and 7 minutes of daylight; by January 30 . . .
  • The conundrum is this: What tart, juicy, red berry, available locally and full of healthy antioxidants that could benefit us all year round, is relegated to a one-month appearance at the table? That would be the cranberry. Despite their amazing . . .
  • The brilliant red and orange leaves have fallen, leaving a more monochromatic palette of russet oak leaves and late yellow maples, punctuated by the bright orange and red berries of some of our most beautiful and least desirable plants. . . .
  • While the humble pumpkin’s annual moment of glory has passed, if the family jack o’lantern is still looking perky or you never got around to carving it, now is the time to convert the ornamental to practical. If your carved pumpkins . . .
  • Ken Druse, garden designer, photographer and lecturer, is often credited with founding the American natural gardening movement; Clarkson Potter has just published Druse’s Planthropology, the latest in his series of musings on the . . .
  • Such good news! A family get-together to celebrate a birthday. Such bad news! The birthday girl, newly embarked on a popular weight-loss program, wants no dense chocolate torte or pie-and-ice cream treat at the party. . . .
  • A toast to the apples of October, with cider made from apples of a tree that grows in the yard of summer-only neighbors. This year its branches dragged on the ground under the weight of tart-sweet, baseball-sized fruit and the race was . . .
  • What do Louisville Sluggers and Wabanaki baskets have in common? Both are made from white ash, a tree under threat of decimation by the emerald ash borer (EAB). The fingernail-sized EAB, which is native to China and eastern . . .
  • In a conversation with vineyard owner Bud Savage of Savage Oakes Vineyard and Winery in Union, he mentioned that in Minnesota, another cold-climate wine-growing area, small vineyards that have been in operation for 15 to . . .
  • How can it be that just as everything in the garden has reached its most luxurious peak, it’s threatened with overnight extinction? The arch of scarlet runner beans intertwined with blue and magenta morning glories, the seven-foot-tall . . .
  • They don’t call it Endless Summer Flower Farm for nothin’. The dahlia gardens are in their glory right now at Phil and Karen Clark’s farm at 57 East Fork Road, Camden, just five minutes from the center of town. The name . . .
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