Latest Rockland, Maine, weather
GO
search sponsored by
Tuesday, May 22, 2018
Thursday, May 17, 2018 7:56 AM
The opening of the U.S. embassy in Jerusalem Monday did not cause the deadly Gaza protest, but it sure didn’t help. Gazans planned the “Great Return March” in December, days after Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. . . .
  • Critics (myself included) tend to predict President Trump’s policies will lead to catastrophe. But with Trump, catastrophe is always coming but never gets here. At least not yet. His disruptions of normal economics and diplomacy . . .
  • What changed Kim Jong Un’s mind to suddenly throw away all the money, security and family heritage he has invested in nukes? In less than a year he has switched from threatening nuclear holocaust to sweet reason and brotherly embraces. . . .
  • Trump supporters are analyzed in two general streams: the economically left-behind vs. the culturally displaced. The first seeks explanations in stagnant wages, dying industries and offshoring. The second seeks explanations in the rise of . . .
  • The U.S.-U.K.-French strike of 103 cruise missiles on Syrian chemical-warfare installations and Moscow’s reaction were so restrained they almost look pretend, as if the two sides were doing reality TV. Missing was the horror, rage and . . .
  • On Syria, what will we do — too much or too little? Initial betting is on too little, that is, not enough to change Damascus’s (and Moscow’s) mind on using, with impunity, poison gas. A year ago, Syria killed nearly 100, mostly civilians, with Sarin gas. . . .
  • Does the recent expulsion of 60 Russian “diplomats” signal President Trump’s abandonment of his be-nice-to-Russia policy? In three years, he has said nothing publicly against Russia or Putin and orders his staff to do the same. . . .
  • You may now wish social media did not possess your personal information. But you probably surrendered your privacy when they asked you, and even after you “delete” it, they’ve still got your data. This we learn from Facebook’s sale of . . .
  • Some 15 years ago, one captured Al Qaeda official reportedly broke under prolonged torture and mouthed bogus intel that Iraq was behind 9/11. Torture subjects often tell the torturers what they want to hear. By believing him, the Bush . . .
  • Three questions: (1) Are we in a new cold war? (2) Could we have prevented it? (3) How to handle it? Harvard’s Stephen Walt sees no cold war, just bad U.S.-Russian relations. Granted, messianic Marxism-Leninism has expired. . . .
  • In 1969, Tony Shub — the Washington Post’s Moscow correspondent who had just been expelled for critical views and contacts with dissidents — did a series for the paper, “Russia Turns Back the Clock.” He meant that after a few hopeful years . . .
  • The early-1950s movie and radio series “I Was a Communist for the FBI” could be updated to “I Was a Republican for the FSB.” (The FSB is the Russian successor to the Soviet KGB, Moscow’s main intelligence agency.) . . .
  • In 1961, refugee German scholar Fritz Stern offered a theory of “cultural despair” to explain the rise of Nazism. Germans, he argued, had nothing to believe in. The Enlightenment, free democracy and the market economy had failed. . . .
  • Reports of the demise of ideology have been greatly exaggerated. The overarching belief systems that proclaim the best way to structure society are still with us. And, looking at the ideological polarization of our current politics . . .
  • George Will, dean of conservative columnists, demonstrated with his usual lucidity in last weekend’s Washington Post that Americans do not save nearly enough for retirement. This has long been noted, but one reason for this is that . . .
  • In 1921, Spanish philosopher Ortega y Gasset published “España Invertebrada” (Spain Without a Backbone), a collection of his newspaper columns, bemoaning his country’s paralysis, which collapsed with Franco’s 1936 military . . .
  • Two weeks ago in Hawaii, the human-computer interface monster reared up again: Mistakenly pressing a drop-down button automatically spewed out false news of a missile attack. Once “this is not a drill” went out instantly to all cellphones . . .
  • Of all the things President Trump has said, his sneer at “[poop pit] countries” sending us their wretched is one of his least-odious utterances. And what should have been a two-day flap is lasting for weeks, marking a sea change . . .
  • Is President Trump more vulnerable over alleged Russian ties or Oval Office rages? We have been focusing on Russiagate, but Michael Wolff’s new book shifts that focus. Russian meddling points to impeachment, but doubts about . . .
  • If the world blows up in 2018, the underlying cause will be that its three most powerful regimes — the U.S., Russia and China — are scared. They fear, justifiably, instability and the other powers. This makes them dangerous and unpredictable. . .
  • The 2011 film “Margin Call” opens with the risk manager getting fired and escorted out of a major investment bank. As the elevator closes, he slips a thumb drive to a younger analyst, warning, “Be careful.” The stick’s data reveal . . .
Looking for something older? Try our archive search