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Friday, May 25, 2018
Black-Throated Green Warbler (Photos by Don Reimer)
Black-Throated Green Warbler (Photos by Don Reimer)
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Thursday, May 3, 2018 8:12 AM
Spring has arrived! What’s my basic list of annual spring tasks? Install the window screens, ready the lawn mower, retrieve deck chairs and the barbeque grill from storage and (during any spare moment) maintain a sharp eye out for . . .
  • Wading the Wetlands—
    With the onset of spring nesting season, songbirds become the major avian focus for many birders. After all, a brightly plumaged Canada Warbler or fire-red Scarlet Tanager is definitely a visual treat. But other less conspicuous species . . .
  • The Maine Bird Atlas Takes Wing —
    Signals of the advancing spring season abound. Choruses of wood frogs clacking from forested vernal pools; hoarse barking grunts of courting gray squirrels echo through the hardwoods. And are you noticing some increasing intensity . . .
  • All Black and White—
    As spring approaches, birders await the arrival of vibrant, colorful warblers flitting through the treetops. During Maine’s winter period, however, scores of black-and-white birds have dominated the oceanic birding scene. These are members . . .
  • Handled with Care—
    What inquisitive child isn’t captivated by seeing or holding a fuzzy baby chick in their hands? In adult life, I’ve had several opportunities to hold wild birds in my own hands under several sets of different circumstances. Let’s view three species . . .
  • Partridge in a Pear Tree—
    Two members of the Gallinaceous or “chicken-like” grouse family occur in Maine. Despite some color variations in feathering patterns, the Ruffed Grouse and Spruce Grouse share a general similarity in shape and appearance. Their contrasting . . .
  • Just Duckie—
    Let’s start with a disclaimer: I don’t pretend to know exactly how ducks think or about the motivations behind their various actions. However, I certainly enjoy watching and speculating over (in human terms) their compelling behaviors . . .
  • Birding with Don Reimer: Inchworm—
    One recent Saturday, I went birding with friends at Pemaquid Point. Throughout my boyhood in nearby New Harbor, I tramped much of the point’s picturesque terrain on an intimate inch-by-inch basis. Mere inches . . .
  • Staying Warm—
    Throughout a fortnight of extended cold snap, Mainers endured sub-zero temperatures, howling winds and blowing snow. “It’s January in Maine,” we tell ourselves. We stayed indoors when possible and dressed snugly when venturing . . .
  • An Old Red Notebook—
    As I was combing through a box of materials in preparation for the December 16th Thomaston/Rockland Christmas Bird Count, a dog-eared red notebook brimming with historical data from previous counts resurfaced. . . .
  • Birding with Don Reimer: Christmas Bird Count, 2017—
    According to Forrest Gump’s mother, “Life is like a box of chocolates; you never know what you’re gonna get.” The same might apply to annual Christmas Bird Counts. Each year is different in terms of weather and travel conditions for . . .
  • Just Ask Alexa—
    I admit to being somewhat of a dinosaur when it comes to dealing with technology. I wear an analog wrist-watch and carry a basic cell phone strictly for purposes of work duties or dire emergencies. I don’t tweet, Instagram or get social . . .
  • Lasting Loon Memories—
    Through- out the summer months, the mournful yodel of Common Loons embodies the primal call of the wild on Maine’s lakes. Loons are now arriving from inland locations and remote interior breeding sites within the northern US . . .
  • NIMBYs—
    Most folks are probably familiar with the acronym NIMBY, standing for “not in my back yard.” For us humans, opposition to potentially controversial projects close to our homes, like proposals for hazardous waste facilities, power plants . . .
  • Egret 84T—
    Growing up as a Nature-prone kid, I would occasion- ally ponder various stretches of woodland and contemplate what kinds of birds and animals might lurk within a given tract of forest. I would envision the tree cover as a rising theatre . . .
  • Maine’s Falcons—
    Falcons being true creatures of open skies, we wouldn’t expect to find them lurking around our bird feeders. That’s the general beat of bird-hunting, woodland species, such as the Sharp-Shinned or Cooper’s Hawk. Maine has . . .
  • Another Migration—
    At first glance, bird watching seems like a straight- forward activity: enjoy the birds around your home feeders or perhaps venture afield to specific birding locations. But multiple factors play a role in determining what birds we will actually see . . .
  • Out the Window—
    In writing a bi-monthly bird column, I’m always questing for (hopefully) interesting and informative photos to accompany my columns. Often the subject of a given column is dictated by a pick-of-the-week photo that happens during routine . . .
  • Speed Dating—
    Many bird watchers have a favorite bird, but what criteria do they use to decide? Favorites are often commonly seen birds that have some aspect of unique appeal to the viewer. Choosing a favorite may depend on multiple factors . . .
  • Shades of Night—
    The August 21st total eclipse of the sun drew intense national media attention and personal interest. Requiring about 90 minutes to cross the entire country, the 60-to-70-mile-wide “path of totality” lasted approximately two and a half . . .

  • Walking on Stilts—
    Of my favorite local birding stops, the Weskeag Marsh in South Thomaston ranks near the top. Several rich and varied habitat types, including stretches of mature softwood and hardwood forest, alder shrub and sprawling grassland . . .
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