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Saturday, November 18, 2017
Egret 84T (Photos by Don Reimer) Click on the dots below for more photos.
Egret 84T (Photos by Don Reimer) Click on the dots below for more photos.
Thursday, October 26, 2017 7:47 AM
Growing up as a Nature-prone kid, I would occasion- ally ponder various stretches of woodland and contemplate what kinds of birds and animals might lurk within a given tract of forest. I would envision the tree cover as a rising theatre . . .
  • NIMBYs—
    Most folks are probably familiar with the acronym NIMBY, standing for “not in my back yard.” For us humans, opposition to potentially controversial projects close to our homes, like proposals for hazardous waste facilities, power plants . . .
  • Maine’s Falcons—
    Falcons being true creatures of open skies, we wouldn’t expect to find them lurking around our bird feeders. That’s the general beat of bird-hunting, woodland species, such as the Sharp-Shinned or Cooper’s Hawk. Maine has . . .
  • Another Migration—
    At first glance, bird watching seems like a straight- forward activity: enjoy the birds around your home feeders or perhaps venture afield to specific birding locations. But multiple factors play a role in determining what birds we will actually see . . .
  • Out the Window—
    In writing a bi-monthly bird column, I’m always questing for (hopefully) interesting and informative photos to accompany my columns. Often the subject of a given column is dictated by a pick-of-the-week photo that happens during routine . . .
  • Speed Dating—
    Many bird watchers have a favorite bird, but what criteria do they use to decide? Favorites are often commonly seen birds that have some aspect of unique appeal to the viewer. Choosing a favorite may depend on multiple factors . . .
  • Shades of Night—
    The August 21st total eclipse of the sun drew intense national media attention and personal interest. Requiring about 90 minutes to cross the entire country, the 60-to-70-mile-wide “path of totality” lasted approximately two and a half . . .

  • Walking on Stilts—
    Of my favorite local birding stops, the Weskeag Marsh in South Thomaston ranks near the top. Several rich and varied habitat types, including stretches of mature softwood and hardwood forest, alder shrub and sprawling grassland . . .
  • bandedbirds.org—
    Whenever I scan through a flock of birds, I maintain a long-held habit: I focus close attention on their legs. For sure, every species has a unique pair of legs finely suited to lifestyle and daily function, but that’s not why I do this. . . .
  • Second Broods—
    As a matter of curious interest, I hang an old lobster bait bag in a maple tree in my front yard each spring, holding an offering of nest-building materials for arriving spring birds. Birds can select from several choices — cut-up pieces of . . .
  • Ant-ics—
    A family of American Crows nested behind my house this spring. The nestlings made persistent begging calls over several weeks, but now the assembled family roams freely throughout the neighborhood. . . .
  • On the Road Again—
    While driving a section of Route 17 in May, I encoun- tered an all-too-familiar sight — a sizeable mat of fluffed feathers lying on the median strip. And for better or worse, my curiosity reigns supreme whenever I approach a lifeless . . .
  • Sittin’ Pretty—
    For hopeful birders seeking May migrants, there are a number of quality Maine birding sites to ponder. Portland’s Evergreen Cemetery, Scarborough Marsh and the Kennebunk Plains quickly come to mind. In the midcoast . . .
  • Safe and Sound—
    With the nesting season well under way, many species feel a need to protect their nest and young from predators. Serious threats can come from other birds that may devour eggs and young or from a variety of mammals patrolling . . .
  • River Pirates—
    Along the banks of the Georges River in Warren village, signs of spring abound. The annual construction of the town’s alewife trap is now under way in preparation for the flood of migrating fish in mid-May. . . .
  • Mad About Decoys—
    In the late 1970s, I met a boater returning to New Harbor from an exploratory trip to Eastern Egg Rock, the island restoration site of Atlantic Puffins in Muscongus Bay. The man was very excited as he announced . . .
  • Spring Calendars—
    Some birders who keep detailed records of spring bird arrivals like to post FOY (first one seen for this year) sightings on the Maine Birds Googlegroup website. For instance, the initial spring arrival of Ospreys at the roadside nesting . . .
  • Scarce as Hen’s Teeth—
    The other day I watched a herring gull swallow an entire 12" fish in one gulp. Being hotly pursued by a second gull, the original gull swallowed the fish to avoid an outcome of imminent robbery. In order to maintain high metabolic . . .
  • Shades of Gray—
    Except for the busy traffic flow along Route 131, Sears-mont, Maine, is generally a quiet rural town of unhurried secondary roadways. But the town’s sleepy character shifted somewhat on February 22 when Searsmont birder Fyn Kynd . . .
  • Two Thrushes—
    You may have noticed scores of American Robins through- out the midcoast this winter. Sizeable numbers were encountered on most of December’s local Christmas bird counts as well. Although robins are considered traditional . . .
  • Maine’s Spring Eagles—
    Although it’s now mid-February, plenty of winter weather remains until spring. But don’t tell that to the state’s bald eagles. Across the midcoast region, eagles are making preparations for spring nesting. As additional sticks are . . .
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