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Friday, July 20, 2018
Thursday, July 19, 2018 8:58 AM
Many times I’ve walked down a frozen-foods aisle in a supermarket and wondered how it could be that somewhere on the planet there grew enough spinach and peas to fill and freeze endless bags and boxes. We never have enough . . .
  • Despite a slow start, semi-drought and the recent heat wave, gardens are thriving. As in most years, we have our successes — during May and June we ate asparagus like it was our job — and failures: the first spinach, much prized . . .
  • Everything is up and thriving in the garden and the humid heat and scattered thunderstorms of early July have shifted plant growth into overdrive. The mulched beds look tidy, peas climb their supports and garlic scapes are spiraling . . .
  • So-called traditional Fourth of July food is red, white and blue — strawberry and blueberry pie topped with stars- and-stripes crust, compotes and trifles of strawberries and blueberries layered with whipped cream or custard — desserts that are served . . .
  • Last week,when traveling south through New England, we saw multiflora roses blooming everywhere: spilling down banks, climbing trees, and filling the air with their scent. It’s not easy to hate these invasives; their delicate white blossoms . . .
  • I’m writing from 180 years ago, by the light of a kerosene lamp that banishes the twilight darkness of a rainy late-Sunday afternoon. We’ve traveled to central Pennsylvania to an 1836 log cabin owned by my partner’s family for several . . .
  • My car poised on the bow of a ferry en route to Vinalhaven, I watch as a slow-moving offshore fog bank erases all signs of the island, the temperature dropping from a sunny 76 degrees in Rockland to a dank, chilly 48 at the landing . . .
  • Spring continues to be cool and rainy as it inches toward early summer, but the rains, combined with some sunny days, help seeds to push their way through the soil and transplants to stay perky. Our tomato seedlings were on . . .
  • It’s a familiar scenario: just before heading out to plant the garden, you take out your jar or shoe box of miscellaneous seed packages saved for years, with perhaps a few marigold or squash seeds you’ve harvested from the garden . . .
  • Dividing a bed of badly overgrown daylilies can be a daunting task, probably the reason our bed became so overgrown in the first place. While it’s recommended that division be done in the fall, after the lilies have finished blooming . . .
  • Driving up the Eastern Seaboard in early May, you meet spring head-on in Virginia. Redbud and dogwood bloom stand out against the acid green of newly leafed-out trees, while daffodils and tulips brighten the roadside rest areas. . . .
  • What? Not celebrating Cinco de Mayo this year? You really should, for at least a couple reasons: this year it falls on a Saturday, so tequila can be judiciously consumed throughout the day; and after an endless winter and slow spring . . .
  • Home & Garden: The 50th Anniversary of Curbside Recycling
    It’s such an ingrained habit that I can hardly recall a time when I didn’t rinse out juice bottles and yogurt containers, flatten empty tissue and cereal boxes, and take reuseable cotton bags to the supermarket. Yet this year marks only . . .
  • When true spring weather finally arrives and windows are thrown open to the warming breezes, some of us — assuredly not me — think of cleaning. My former mother-in-law, already mistress of the world’s cleanest house, was a big . . .
  • I’ve spent most of the last three months helping to rehab a vintage hurricane-ravaged trailer in southwest Florida — so vintage that in tearing out floors and window trim we found damage not just from Hurricane Irma, but from her predecessor . . .
  • April can be very cruel, with its late snow squalls, and mud season to be endured before lilacs — or any spring blossoms — brighten the land. The strengthening sun will soon overcome the cold, but for inspiration while you wait . . .
  • I’m not even going to try to predict whether Easter will be temperate or freezing, but whatever the weather, it’s best to at least pretend it’s spring and serve some traditional recipes. You may wear a flowered bonnet and mud boots . . .
  • The days are longer and the sun stronger. The spring equinox officially arrived on March 20th, but the string of late snowstorms has thwarted gardeners who are eager to get out and get dirty. If you’re frustrated by the reluctant spring and . . .
  • With St. Patrick’s Day being the sole holiday to occur in March (Easter falls on April 1), it’s necessary to celebrate, whether you’re Irish or not. I’ve decided I’m not such a big fan of corned beef; it’s the sides — the soda bread and vegetables . . .
  • Wood — or the lack of it — has been on my mind lately, even before an article on Maine wood products appeared in my inbox, sent from Forests for Maine’s Future. We’re still in the process of post-Irma reconstruction, along with . . .
  • You’ve made it through the shortest days of winter and the misery of seeing a fat groundhog predict six more weeks of the same, and you’re coming into the home stretch in the race towards spring. But the winter blahs, sometimes . . .
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