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Wednesday, January 17, 2018
Thursday, January 11, 2018 7:42 AM
Sixty-eight days of winter remain, and while not all of them will reveal a polar landscape at dawn and have temperatures dipping to 20 below, it’s still a long wait for those who want to start digging and planting. My advice: turn away . . .
  • We’re all eager to recycle that fresh Christmas tree: it’s too sad to strip off the glitter and ornaments and just kick it to the curb, especially if the tree is still green and redolent of pine. The possibilities for reusing your tree are legion . . .
  • Congratulations! It’s nearly January 1, and if you’re reading this, you’ve almost made it through a year of political insanity, wildfires and hurricanes. The solstice is behind us and days are getting longer: by the end of January we’ll have . . .
  • With only a few days remaining until Christmas, a last-minute stop at a good bookstore can yield the perfect gift for the gardeners and cooks on your shopping list, one that continues to give well into the new year. While there are . . .
  • Whether you combine them in baskets of gourmet treats or tuck them into a stocking, homemade preserves, salsas, chutneys and jams are always a welcome gift. Here are three treats made with seasonal ingredients . . .
  • Welcome to the annual gift suggestions for cooks and gardeners, which is, as you correctly surmise, a thinly disguised wish list for yours truly. But being a cook and gardener, I enjoy making suggestions that others might find helpful. . . .
  • This column comes too late to advise Black Friday shoppers, not that I necessarily believe in a holiday tradition whereby the family gobbles Thanksgiving dinner and then, instead of a brisk game of touch football in the yard, dons . . .
  • There are three phases of a Thanksgiving turkey: the holiday meal, the leftovers, and the soup. How you interact with the turkey in all of its incarnations is largely a matter of tradition. The meal can be tinkered with, but many hold out . . .
  • We just celebrated Halloween, a singular holiday of unalloyed fun: costumes, candy, spooky thrills — what could be better than that? Well, how about Thanksgiving, with its great food, family and/or friends getting together, and sports . . .
  • By now, everyone knows that when you set the clock back from daylight saving time, it’s also the time to change the batteries in smoke alarms and smoke detectors. Like a shrill little bird, my own detector began a shrill peeping . . .
  • The unprecedented warmth of October this year has resulted in a peculiar foliage phenomenon: some brilliant fall colors interspersed with trees still fully leafed out in green. This mosh-up can also be seen in the garden: while the . . .
  • It remains unseasonably warm here on the coast of Maine but the weather is still cool enough for planting fall bulbs. While those of us who live in cooler climates think that daffodils and tulips are more suited to our growing zones . . .
  • Somehow, in this world of climate gone wrong, of wildfires, hurricanes, earthquakes and landslides, some things remain much the same for those of us lucky enough to live where the weather, and thus the growing season, has been . . .
  • It’s crazy warm for October, with no frost in sight. This record warmth brings tropical storms and hurricanes, muted fall foliage colors, and some questions as to what the gardens will do in this extended season. Will we still be . . .
  • For several weeks I’d been planning to talk about information I had from the Alliance For Community Trees on how cities have started tracking the amount of money their trees earn for them each year. It’s a fact that leafy . . .
  • If your summer containers are looking a bit scraggly, don’t rush to empty them out; give them a new lease on life by subbing in plants that can survive later into the fall. Before swapping out the plants, make sure any pot you plan to renew . . .
  • Pesto? Big yawn, so over, so ’80s, right? Don’t be so fast to rush to judgement, my friends; a sauce that originated in Liguria in the 16th century remains a classic that will never fall out of favor. Besides, what else can gardeners do with . . .
  • For some, the first autumnal chill heralds their favorite season. For me, the early-morning sound of the first schoolbus bumping along the road between the first coloring leaves is a tiny death knell. I can never let go of summer without a fight. . . .
  • Home & Garden: Maine’s Roadside Pollinator Study
    Mention the Department of Transportation and images of traffic-stalled road construction or closed one-lane bridge repairs instantly come to mind; the DOT as a conservation agency? Not so much. But the Maine Department of Transportation . . .
  • A quick look around the late-summer garden confirms why a popular hydrangea variety is named “Endless Summer.”
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