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Friday, September 21, 2018
Thursday, September 20, 2018 7:21 AM
No pressure, but there’s just under a hundred days left until Christmas. Fortunately, with the bounty of the garden available to us, we can get a jump on some gourmet gifts from the kitchen. I feel a bit foolish churning out lots of jars of relish when . . .
  • Its clouds of white blossoms cover acres of ground, tumbling over the banks of streams and verges of roads. It’s possibly the world’s most invasive plant — nickname “Godzilla weed” — allegedly responding only to massive doses . . .
  • Yesterday I sat in the darkened parking lot of a big-box store that was closing for the night. As employees gathered up shopping carts, joking and calling to each other over the rattle of wheels, I looked over at the dim glow of the garden . . .
  • Home & Garden: Desperately Seeking Tulips
    In Texas it’s bluebonnets. The Southwest, golden poppies. Magnolias and azaleas do it for Dixie, and ferns and hellebores the Pacific Northwest. But if it’s spring in Maine, there must be tulips. Deer may munch them, chipmunks nibble the . . .
  • This is it, the final days of abundance from the garden, the time we’ve waited for all season, when beans and summer squash, tomatoes and cucumbers, peppers and corn can be picked until we stagger under the weight of the overflowing . . .
  • Maine has many agricultural fairs, as well as the absolutely unique Common Ground Country Fair in Unity. Common Ground remains in a category all its own, sponsored since 1977 by Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association . . .
  • There’s a lot of good eating coming from the gardens right now: beans, summer squashes, snap peas, greens, lots of herbs. We’re snitching almost-ready-to-harvest garlic and onions and digging along under the mulch to feel for new . . .
  • In my summer travels, I compulsively check out all windowboxes, hanging baskets, ornamental planters and pots, mentally applauding those with blossoms and foliage that spill lushly over their sides and consigning those . . .
  • Many times I’ve walked down a frozen-foods aisle in a supermarket and wondered how it could be that somewhere on the planet there grew enough spinach and peas to fill and freeze endless bags and boxes. We never have enough . . .
  • Despite a slow start, semi-drought and the recent heat wave, gardens are thriving. As in most years, we have our successes — during May and June we ate asparagus like it was our job — and failures: the first spinach, much prized . . .
  • Everything is up and thriving in the garden and the humid heat and scattered thunderstorms of early July have shifted plant growth into overdrive. The mulched beds look tidy, peas climb their supports and garlic scapes are spiraling . . .
  • So-called traditional Fourth of July food is red, white and blue — strawberry and blueberry pie topped with stars- and-stripes crust, compotes and trifles of strawberries and blueberries layered with whipped cream or custard — desserts that are served . . .
  • Last week,when traveling south through New England, we saw multiflora roses blooming everywhere: spilling down banks, climbing trees, and filling the air with their scent. It’s not easy to hate these invasives; their delicate white blossoms . . .
  • I’m writing from 180 years ago, by the light of a kerosene lamp that banishes the twilight darkness of a rainy late-Sunday afternoon. We’ve traveled to central Pennsylvania to an 1836 log cabin owned by my partner’s family for several . . .
  • My car poised on the bow of a ferry en route to Vinalhaven, I watch as a slow-moving offshore fog bank erases all signs of the island, the temperature dropping from a sunny 76 degrees in Rockland to a dank, chilly 48 at the landing . . .
  • Spring continues to be cool and rainy as it inches toward early summer, but the rains, combined with some sunny days, help seeds to push their way through the soil and transplants to stay perky. Our tomato seedlings were on . . .
  • It’s a familiar scenario: just before heading out to plant the garden, you take out your jar or shoe box of miscellaneous seed packages saved for years, with perhaps a few marigold or squash seeds you’ve harvested from the garden . . .
  • Dividing a bed of badly overgrown daylilies can be a daunting task, probably the reason our bed became so overgrown in the first place. While it’s recommended that division be done in the fall, after the lilies have finished blooming . . .
  • Driving up the Eastern Seaboard in early May, you meet spring head-on in Virginia. Redbud and dogwood bloom stand out against the acid green of newly leafed-out trees, while daffodils and tulips brighten the roadside rest areas. . . .
  • What? Not celebrating Cinco de Mayo this year? You really should, for at least a couple reasons: this year it falls on a Saturday, so tequila can be judiciously consumed throughout the day; and after an endless winter and slow spring . . .
  • Home & Garden: The 50th Anniversary of Curbside Recycling
    It’s such an ingrained habit that I can hardly recall a time when I didn’t rinse out juice bottles and yogurt containers, flatten empty tissue and cereal boxes, and take reuseable cotton bags to the supermarket. Yet this year marks only . . .
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