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Friday, May 25, 2018
Sweet Tree Arts works to encourage community and creativity for midcoast people of all ages.
Sweet Tree Arts works to encourage community and creativity for midcoast people of all ages.
Thursday, May 24, 2018 10:24 AM
Sweet Tree Arts, Oyster River Winegrowers, and Uproot Pie Company are joining forces to present a Story Slam, Saturday, May 26, on the grounds of Oyster River Winegrowers, 929 Oyster River Road in Warren. Beginning at . . .
  • Poet Richard Blanco Live on WRFR May 29 —
    Poet Richard Blanco will appear live on the “21st Century Bohemian” radio program on WRFR, 93.3 Rockland/99.3 Camden, on Tuesday, May 29, from 6 to 8 p.m. Selected by President Obama as the fifth US presidential inaugural poet . . .
  • Maine Writers & Publishers Alliance has announced the finalists for the 2018 Maine Literary Awards. The awards honor books published during 2017, as well as adult and youth manuscripts in drama, fiction, nonfiction and poetry. . . .
  • Writer, Comedian, Actor John Hodgman to Sign His Memoir
    Left Bank Books in downtown Belfast invites the public to meet John Hodgman on Wednesday, May 30, at 2 p.m., when he will be signing copies of the just-released paperback edition of his latest book, “Vacationland: True Stories from . . .
  • Eva Morris, a performance coach, is inviting midcoast authors of “hip, fresh, and funny literature” to perform a 10-minute reading of their work onstage at Camden Public Library at a date to be determined. Morris will coach participants . . .
  • Book Review: McCain — Trump More Interested In Appearing Tough Than In The Nation's Values
    In a new memoir, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., offers a harsh assess- ment of President Donald Trump’s leadership, asserting that his “reality show facsimile of toughness” seems to matter more to him than the nation’s values. . . .
  • Book Review: The Most Exciting Novel About Trees You'll Ever Read
    Henry David Thoreau once heaved a big stone against the trunk of a chestnut tree to bring down a shower of nuts. He loved their sweet meat, but the meal filled him with guilt. “It is worse than boorish, it is criminal, to inflict an . . .
  • Book Review: Finally, A Comic Novel Gets A Pulitzer Prize. It's About Time.
    Andrew Sean Greer did something rare last week: His latest novel, “Less,” won the Pulitzer Prize in fiction. That’s extraordinary, of course, but what makes this year’s winner so unusual is that his novel is funny. Very funny.
  • Once in a while I read a book that is so powerful, so enlightening, so possibly life-changing that as a bookseller, and as a human being, I want to share news of its arrival as widely as I can. For the last week I have been reading Richard Powers . . .
  • Book Review: Rescuing Humanity From Big Tech
    Over the past decade or so, books decrying the internet have been published at a steady clip. These what-have-we-wrought manifestos — Evgeny Morozov’s “The Net Delusion,” Jaron Lanier’s “You Are Not a Gadget” . . .
  • Book Reviews: Best New Children’s & Young-Adult Books Released in the Past Month
    Brendan Wenzel’s “Hello Hello” (Chronicle, Ages 3-6) is exuberant and captivating, even if this ode to the wonderfully diverse but fragile world of animals has a solemn underlying message. The bright palette is delicious . . .
  • Book Review: A Quiet Force That Shaped Our Nation, But Unacklowledged
    Its influence begins before birth and holds sway beyond the grave. It can determine who goes to prison and who goes to the Ivy League, who drinks bottled prestige water and who swigs from a foul tap, who rents rooms . . .
  • Book Review:
    “Norwich: One Tiny Vermont Town’s Secret to Happiness and Excellence” is a small book with a big message. Here, Karen Crouse, a New York Times sportswriter, examines how an out-of-the-way place with a population of about . . .
  • Book Review: The Underside of Public Housing History
    In the mid-1990s, Rep. Christopher Shays (R-Conn.), the chairman of the House Government Reform and Oversight subcommittee on human resources and intergovernmental relations, was scheduled to check into a fancy Chicago hotel the . . .
  • Book Review: It's "Citizens United" All Over Again.
    In a recent class on American business history, I asked my students what they thought a corpora- tion was. A hand in the front row quickly shot up, and a woman answered, “Not people!” Although we eventually got around to a more formal . . .
  • Book Review: A Rediscovery of Tribalism
    The single most important intellec- tual trend of our time is the popular rediscov- ery of human tribalism. We thought we had it licked. For roughly 200,000 years, humans ran around in small, clannish groups, hunting and mating together . . .
  • Book Review: A Life In The Country Reveals Surprises
    What urban couple wouldn’t want to trade the din of the Q train for the sound of crickets, exchange a cramped apartment for a spacious old building steeped in history, only a few hours drive from downtown Manhattan?
  • Book Review: More Than You Ever Wanted to Know About the War in Afghanistan
    In Kabul in December, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani told Vice President Pence that more senior Taliban members had been killed in 2017 than in the previous 15 years combined. “Real progress,” Pence said. The dry language of wire . . .
  • Book Review: Sometimes You Just Need to Take A Breath
    Jeremy Bernard recalls sitting in Los Angeles traffic, a passenger in the car of an increasingly upset driver. His friend was leaning on the horn, blasting out annoyance and impatience in short, angry bursts. “I hate to be preachy, but take a breath” . . .
  • Sue Grafton, Author of Best-Selling “Alphabet” Mysteries, Dies at 77
    Sue Grafton, a best-selling crime novelist whose popular “alphabet” mysteries featuring Southern California detective Kinsey Millhone sold millions of copies worldwide, died December 28 in Santa Barbara, California. She was 77. . . .
  • Book Review: How Well Do We All Know The Bill of Rights?
    Every week, Americans are confronted with a growing sense of political and economic crisis, from the inequalities of the new economy to renewed debates about racial and gender discrimination to fresh stresses on our political . . .
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