One of Friday’s key-note speakers is Paul Greenberg, author of “American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood” (Penguin Press, June, 2014). His book explores why the United States, the country that controls the most ocean of any nation on earth, imports more than three-quarters of its seafood from abroad.
One of Friday’s key-note speakers is Paul Greenberg, author of “American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood” (Penguin Press, June, 2014). His book explores why the United States, the country that controls the most ocean of any nation on earth, imports more than three-quarters of its seafood from abroad.
"All things food in Maine" will be celebrated at Maine Fare on Friday and Saturday, June 20 and 21, on the waterfront in Belfast. The two days of good food served up with good food for thought offers everyone who cares about the local food movement in Maine an opportunity to learn how food is grown, caught, harvested and prepared, sample all kinds of Maine foods, take a cooking class, and hear firsthand stories from chefs, fishermen and farmers.

Maine Fare is hosted by Maine Farmland Trust and Penobscot East Resource Center. An open-air market on both days will feature dozens of Maine-based vendors and food trucks. A farm tour will be available for people wanting a close-up look at growing food in Maine. On Friday night, the Belfast Free Range Music Festival will present Olas, a Portland-based band inspired by flamenco, Afro-Cuban and American folk and rock music.

Cooking classes will range from making crab cakes to fermented foods, to herbal teas and cooking with kids. Local chefs including Melissa Kelly of Primo, Kerry Altiero of Café Miranda, Annemarie Ahearn of Salt Water Farm and Paula Palakawong of Long Grain will demonstrate how they make their specialties and share kitchen stories. There will be tastings of cheese, oysters, cider, beer and more.

Two full days of food forums on Realizing the New England Food Vision, Land and Sea, Rural Revival and Food Access will be presented by food pioneers from Maine and beyond.

On Friday from noon to 12:45 p.m. at the Boathouse, Paul Greenberg and Barton Seaver will discuss the critical role of eaters in creating sustainable oceans and communities in their keynote session "Why We Need to Eat More Local Seafood." Seaver, as director of the Healthy and Sustainable Food Program at the Center for Health and the Global Environment at the Harvard School of Public Health, is on a mission to restore our relationship with the ocean, the land, and with each other - through dinner. His books include "For Cod and Country" and "Where There's Smoke." Greenberg is the author of the NY Times bestseller "Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food" and the just-released "American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood."

Maine Fare organizer Ellen Sabina says, "We are creating an event that shows the full breadth of the Maine food system, from fishermen and farmers to our plates, and everything in between. It's delicious and fun, but it's also meant to get folks to think more deeply about their food, the folks behind it, and tough issues, like hunger and rural vitality. We want Maine Fare-goers to be inspired to bring change to their own communities."

Fare admission is free; some cooking classes and some activities require sign-up or a small fee. To see the extensive schedule of events and to sign up for classes, visit www.maine-fare.org.