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Wednesday, June 28, 2017
Thursday, June 22, 2017 8:06 AM
The prospect of weeding a 6-by-20-foot strawberry bed was daunting, until I realized that the majority of the weeds were lamb’s quarters — easy to pull and, more important, delicious to eat. I began a two-part pulling operation, with weeds . . .
  • After an exceedingly cold and rainy spring, the recent stretch of sunny days seems like a miracle. Yet, from my upstairs windows looking out over the garden, I see reassuring signs that, despite our worst fears, everything . . .
  • This was a stellar year for lilacs. Though their billowy blooms were frequently bent over by drenching rains, they were no less fragrant or diminished in their beauty. While driving the back roads between Maine and Vermont . . .
  • What with all the rain and raw, dreary weather and lots of family activities occurring over the last few weeks, we somehow missed out on foraging for annual spring greens. Peak collection time for fiddleheads, ramps and even . . .
  • Most gardeners have a stash of seeds left over from previous seasons. How we store them ranges from tossing all the packets into that kitchen drawer dedicated to out-of-date coupons and . . .
  • It’s only human to want what we have not: apples are abundant in New England, but I would sell my soul for a honey mango any day of the week. Potatoes are a staple crop of the Northeast, but I could eat sweet potatoes . . .
  • The calendar may say it’s spring, but with the current fluctuating temperatures, it’s hard to decide when to plant or check for insect invasion. Do the old sayings that used to guide us in selecting dates for planting . . .
  • Home & Garden: Taking the Mystery Out of Composting
    In the best of all possible worlds, every household would separate its trash into returnables, recyclables, trash, and organic wastes such as kitchen scraps and yard and garden materials like grass clippings and leaves. The sanitation . . .
  • Seedlings started, check. Seeds ordered, check. New tools to start the season — not so much. Frugal gardeners — and I am in that category — jury-rig old tools, wire trug handles together and wear hole-ridden gardening gloves until it’s no longer possible . . .
  • We’re spending Easter in the Everglades, as we have for the past four years, but alligator won’t be on the menu. Nor will any egrets, once referred to as “swamp chicken” by local Floridians, be served up. In earlier times these were . . .
  • While it’s a small pollinator, the rusty patched bumble- bee made a big impact in the national news in January when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced its designation as an endangered species — the first ever for a bumblebee . . .
  • If you’re a beginning gardener or a gardener with limited space in patio planters, it’s highly practical to buy started seedlings at a local nursery or garden center. But if there’s a special variety of tomato or broccoli you’d like to try, or . . .
  • Garden? What garden? In March there’s not a lot of ground that isn’t snow-covered, icy or soggy, but the onset of official spring and the lengthening days mean that there are promising warm days when an antsy gardener can tromp . . .
  • March is predictably unpredictable; spring may officially arrive on March 20 in the northern hemisphere, but the day could be brilliantly sunny or beset by a blizzard. Yet we can predict one thing about March: come St. Patrick’s Day . . .
  • March is coming in like a lion everywhere, even here in southwest Florida, where 25-mph winds have rattled through the palms and coconuts the last week. While temperatures still climb into the 80s by midday, nights have been . . .
  • When it comes to writing about the forests and waters, mountains and animals and all the land that is North America, there are some authors whose works are so powerful they changed our way of thinking about nature. Henry David Thoreau . . .
  • On a cold, slushy March day in Providence, Rhode Island, I was walking on College Hill when a blaze of yellow loomed ahead of me, standing out against the background of grey granite buildings. I immediately thought “forsythia” . . .
  • A very wonderful Vermont author, Howard Frank Mosher, died last week, just days after the publication of his final book, “Points North.” Mosher wrote many award-winning novels, as well as “Where the Rivers Flow North,” one of the . . .
  • The true origins of the day of love and kisses named for a saint are shrouded in the mists of time, but the first mention of St. Valentine’s Day as a romantic holiday appeared in the writings of Chaucer in 1382. During the . . .
  • Whether you know it as Imbolc, Candlemas, or Groundhog Day, this mid-point between the winter solstice and spring equinox has been celebrated since ancient times — even before that pagan ritual known as the Super Bowl. . . .
  • There are times when being alone in the garden is sublime. Just after dawn on a summer day, coffee in hand and birdsong in the air, sitting alone on a garden bench is to be as close to paradise as anyone could wish. In fact, the word . . .
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