Latest Rockland, Maine, weather
search sponsored by
Friday, September 30, 2016
Thursday, September 29, 2016 11:22 AM
NEW YORK. Not much news here, except to say that last year we bought a small apartment in the 70s between Columbus and Amsterdam. The contractors (Polish immigrants all, speaking Polish at work, but excellent English . . .)
  • ROCKPORT. The other day, around mid-afternoon, I went outside without my watch. It was one of those beautiful days we have had so many of this summer, and I found myself without anything pressing to do . . .
  • He must have been conspicuous, 36 years ago, in the fall of 1980 when he arrived in El Progreso, Honduras, and even when he left nine months later, the gringo, the young American, riding his bicycle or walking the unnamed, unpaved . . .
  • CENTRAL PARK, NEW YORK CITY. The streets are never completely silent or empty, even at dawn. There are garbage trucks and delivery trucks making their stops, and subways rumbling down below . . .
  • A league at sea is three nautical miles, or about the distance from Curtis Island Light to Mark Island. That is about the distance a cannonball could be launched from shore during the age of sail and exploration . . .
  • SHANGHAI. “That’s so Chinese!” foreigners here often remark among themselves, about aspects of Chinese life that we cannot imagine encountering back home. . . .
  • ROCKPORT. “Dad, I don’t believe you.” My credibility is often challenged within the family. Usually with great success, which seems to please everyone else. But recently I persuaded my college-bound son . . .
  • ROCKPORT. Van Gogh’s famous painting of the night sky was painted from memory, in daylight. Of course, it had to be. Candlelight or gaslight would . . .
  • CAMDEN. There is always a slight foreboding as I negotiate that steep, last step down to Laite Beach. Behind lies the civilization of warm car interior . . .
  • MANHATTAN. I have spent much of my adult life abroad, away from America. I have been "fato profugus," as Virgil said of Aeneas. "Blown onward by fate." Or in my case, drawn forward by the opportunity to work in Central Europe emerging from the Soviet shadows and in China emerging from totalitarian . . .
  • SHANGHAI. When we finally arrived for the concert, we were quite wet from the rain, and rather cross. Shanghai has four major concert halls. Three of them are located in the western half of the city where we live and work, in the district called Puxi, meaning west (xi) of the Huang Pu river. One is the gleaming new . . .
  • SHANGHAI. Like the turning mill-wheel, the year rounds on itself again, and again it is April. As in most years, according to the Jewish and Christian calendars, April is the month for Passover, and - the first Sunday, after the first full moon, after the spring equinox - for Easter. In the historical American . . .
  • SINGAPORE. He was not religious, so if he dreamt in his final days, while rumors and nurses ran through the corridors of the world-class hospital, he dreamt not of heaven, but of an extraordinary life. His face always had a lion's cast. As a teenager, he evaded massacre in the Japanese occupation. After the war, young . . .
  • Beijing. At first, after the film starts streaming, all you see is a chart of Beijing air pollution and all you hear is a woman's voice. Then you see the woman speaking, alone on a bare stage, in jeans and a white blouse, a thin microphone curving round her face. Her audience of young Chinese know her well. Her name . . .
  • MOSCOW. In the winter and spring of 1992, just weeks after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, in a street market in Moscow overlooking the Kremlin and Red Square, a young international lawyer, an American in Russia for the first time, could buy a babushka doll to take home as a keepsake. . . .
  • PARIS. Recent events remind me how Miss Moore, our high school Latin teacher, made the class recite the description in the Commentaries of Julius . . .
  • A COUNTRY ROAD. My son and I are enjoying the drive through this northwest corner of Connecticut even though it is a grey winter's day. The two of us are in high spirits, searching on the radio for mutually congenial music, and having a laugh when something unlistenable or absurd blasts out from some station or . . .
  • ROCKPORT. 2015 AD. Somehow we are surprised by the angle of the sun this time of year. It blinds us as we drive south and west in the afternoon, and also as it rises in the morning through different portions of pine or cedar or oak than in any other season. The low rays entering the windows illuminate odd corners of . . .
  • MILAN. 387 AD. Perhaps with the benefit of today's film technology, we could pretend to fly over the ancient vibrant, anxious city - the western capital in those dangerous days of a divided and declining Roman empire. Through the modern miracle of computer simulation we could hover over streets and markets . . .
  • SOMEWHERE IN CHINA - Go to any news kiosk in Shanghai and, if you read Chinese, you will find many tabloid papers, often called "wanbao" or "evening news." English-language newspapers for foreigners in China often summarize the more sensational or poignant of the tabloid reports - in a prose . . .
  • NAGANO, JAPAN. Last month, an earthquake struck the mountain villages around Nagano, where the Winter Olympics were held in 1998. Houses collapsed, roads buckled, and dozens were hurt, some quite seriously. It reminded me of our family visit to the same place last winter. . . .
12