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Monday, September 26, 2016
Great Egret (Photos by Don Reimer) Click on dots below for more photos.
Great Egret (Photos by Don Reimer) Click on dots below for more photos.
Wednesday, September 07, 2016 11:06 AM
Let’s face it, distin- guishing among the herons and egrets can get a bit confusing. Even some avian experts have fussed with the proper classifications of these species. As members of the wader family, all have long legs and necks . . .
  • Birding with Don Reimer: Between Right and Wrong—
    When spending field time in the company of skilled birders, novice birders are sometimes impressed by an “expert’s” prowess at instantaneous identifications. Bird identification is a honed set of perceptive skills . . .
  • The Air We Breathe—
    The months of August and September initiate the fall migration period for many types of birds. For some species migration happens in graduated, short-hop steps, while others accomplish their impressive feats in a matter of a few . . .
  • The Information Age—
    As I cruise the wave of modern infor- mation techno- logy, I have little doubt that we inhabit the Information Age. According to Buckminster Fuller, who created the “Knowledge Doubling Curve,” up until 1900 human . . .
  • Some Crows and Ravens I have known—
    After years of watching and photo- graphing them, I decided to create a slide presentation all about corvids. Corvids are members of the crow-like family of birds that we all encounter in our daily lives. With 120 corvid species . . .
  • Competition—
    On the surface, one might imagine that birds lead a rather carefree and casual existence. But actually, for birds, competitive forces play a huge role in their success. The competition persists year-round . . .
  • Voices in the Woods—
    Around 4:30 a.m. each morning, I anticipate that a resident male cardinal or a particular chirping robin will launch their dawn chorus that rises to a crescendo within an hour or so. . . .
  • Good for the Heart—
    In my personal life there are very few times when I am disconnected from birds and local wild creatures in their natural habitats. This is my simple, spontaneous response to any given day. . . .
  • Birds and People—
    Birding is certainly a fascinating pastime for a good number of reasons. Since it connects birds, people and the specific circumstances of the moment, any day in the field can bring unexpected . . .
  • Crossing Time Zones — Part 2
    In my column last week, I described the nature scene around Phoenix, Arizona. Now let’s move up to the Grand Canyon. Significant habitat changes were evident on the three-hour drive north. . . .
  • Crossing Time Zones—
    Years ago I remember a balky old New Harbor lobsterman boasting that he hadn’t driven west of the Wiscasset Bridge in well over a decade: “Nothing over there I’m interested in” . . .
  • Drum, Drill, Tap
    In springtime I live in a noisy place. No, it’s not my human neighbors making the commotion – it’s actually six species of vocal, territorial woodpeckers
  • Face it, being a bird isn’t that easy—
    Decades have since passed, but a vivid winter memory lives in my recollection. As a 12-year-old, I was scouting a wooded path in New Harbor and toting along my Daisy pump BB-gun. . . .
  • Springing Ahead—
    In the pre-dawn chill, a male Song Sparrow sings from my front yard — a thrilled, persistent message announcing his intention to raise a brood this year. A second sparrow counter-sings . . .
  • Maine’s Alcids—
    We Mainers are fortunate to have three species of alcids nesting along our coastline in summer. What are alcids? They’re members of a family of web-footed diving birds with short legs . . .
  • West meets East—
    The “predict- able” catalogue of Maine’s wintering birds varies every year for a host of possible reasons. At the top of the list is the availability of consistent, reliable food sources. The scarcity of irruptive winter finches this winter is a prime example . . .
  • Camden’s Ducks—
    As the familiar maxim goes, “If it looks like a duck and walks like a duck, it’s a duck.” While that premise is generally true, the particular kind of duck in question is not always so apparent. Individual species differ widely in size, body shape, color patterns or their distinctive profile in flight.
  • It’s Gulls Again—
    It’s a curious thing with gulls. Even some birders rank gulls low on their priority list, while non-birders may view them as noisy pests poised to snatch their picnic sandwich . . .
  • Maine’s Warbler Scene—
    Normally I wouldn’t be writing a column about warblers in Maine during the winter season, but things seem quite different this year. As an illustrative . . .
  • This Year’s Thomaston-Rockland Christmas Bird Count
    The Thom- aston-Rock- land Christmas Bird Count, conducted on Saturday, December 19, is just one of 32 counts conducted across Maine between . . .
  • Finch Forecast—
    Living in a four-season state like Maine, we come to appreciate the shifting cavalcade of birds that comes our way each month of the year. This . . .