Detail of “At Mouquin’s” (1905), oil by William Glackens, American, 1870–1938
Detail of “At Mouquin’s” (1905), oil by William Glackens, American, 1870–1938
Farnsworth Art Museum will present “Puttin’ on the Ritz: The Gilded Age Restaurants of New York,” an illustrated lecture by Virginia Tuttle, in the museum’s auditorium at 1 p.m. on Thursday, March 9. Tuttle, who lives in Camden, is a retired curator of the National Gallery of Art, and is working on a book about New York restaurants in the period between the Civil War and World War I. 

The restaurant concept was still a fairly new and decidedly French invention when New York City’s first ones opened in the 1830s, and well-heeled patrons had their first taste of French cuisine served in graciously appointed dining rooms. 

Between 1870 and the onset of World War I, New York restaurants became palatial, even bizarre establishments that provided settings for the city’s most extravagant social entertainments. Tuttle will look at both the restaurants’ role in the development of New York’s Gilded Age society, and their intricate, choreographed behind-the-scenes operations, ruled over by great, and invariably French, celebrity chefs.

The program is $5 for Farnsworth members, $8 for non-members. For more information or to register, visit www.farnsworthmuseum.org/education.